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Minerals of Arizona

Courtesy of the Flagg Mineral Foundation

Azurite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Azurite - Morenci, New Extension, Greenlee County

Calcite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Calcite (cave formation known as birds nest) - Bisbee, Arizona

Cerussite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Cerussite - Flux Mine, Santa Cruz County

Chrysocolla

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Chrysocolla (pseudomorphs after azurite crystals) - Miami, Gila County

Chrysocolla Gypsum

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Chrysocolla (pseudomorphs after gypsum crystals) - Ray Mine, Kearny, Pinal County

Copper

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Copper - Santa Rita Mountains, Pima County

Copper

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Copper- Santa Rita Mountains, Pima County

Cuprite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Cuprite Crystals - Bisbee, Cochise County

Gold

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Gold in Quartz - Gold Basin, Mohave County

Gypsum

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Gypsum Crystals - Bisbee, Cochise County

Malachite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Malachite - Bisbee, Cochise County

Pyrite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Pyrite Crystal - Bisbee, Cole Shaft, Cochise County

Wulfenite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Wulfenite - Defiance Mine, Gleeson, Arizona

Wulfenite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Wulfenite - Red Cloud Mine, La Paz County

Wulfenite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Wulfenite - 79 Mine, Hayden, Gila County

Wulfenite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Wulfenite - Amado, Santa Cruz County

Wulfenite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Wulfenite - Red Cloud Mine, La Paz County

Wulfenite

Photo: © Roger N. Weller

Wulfenite - 79 Mine, Hayden, Gila County

Arizona Mineral Education

Arizona minerals are the backbone of the Arizona Experience. Arizona Mineral Education provides links to mineral museums, photo galleries, and education outreach programs. It is a resource for educators, students, and the Arizona public.

Of Earth’s more than 4000 naturally occurring minerals, 76 were first discovered in Arizona. A partial list includes: andersonite, bisbeeite, coesite, fairbankite, flagstaffite, jeromite, navajoite, ransomite, wickenburgite, and yavapaiite.

But Arizona is best known for its eye-catching, world-class examples of copper-bearing minerals - azurite, chalcocite, chalcopyrite, cuprite, malachite, native copper, and turquoise, to name a few -- harvested from porphyry copper deposits from Bisbee to Jerome. But there is more to Arizona minerals than copper. There’s olivine –peridot - (Gila County), rhodocrosite (Cochise County), vanadinite (La Paz County) and wulfenite (Yuma County). And we are just scratching the surface of the 809 minerals found throughout Arizona.

Special Announcement

August 10, 2011 - LAST DAY TO REGISTER!

Register today for "Changing Boundaries: Borderlands of Today and Yesterday" teacher workshop this Saturday, August 13, 2011 at the Arizona History Museum in Tucson. Workshop includes primary resources, GIS technology, historic maps, and professional collaboration. You don't want to miss this. Contact Mary Ann Ruelas to register.